About Us

Tenby Coasteering is a little unlike your run-of-the-mill company because whilst we’re REALLY keen for you to have an amazing time, we actually go coasteering for our own enjoyment as much as yours – we love it. We love the special coasteers we’ve developed, we love the weird seaweeds we find en route and we love the mind-boggling caves (seen by very few humans not wearing our yellow helmets). We love sitting on a rock surrounded by crashing waves, we love watching seals watching us, we love jumping off things.  We think nothing beats the unique satisfaction you get from traversing a wild stretch of coastline and then having a cup of tea in a clifftop carpark with your fellow adventurers. 

Meet the team

Mark - Benevolent Dictator

Mark began adventuring early with a semi-accidental solo crossing of Carmarthen Bay on a catamaran made out of scaffolding, aged 8; a solo ascent of Snowdon aged 10 (his mum thought he’d gone to the Butlins arcade); several attempts on the land-yachting speed record aged 12+ and a successful-ish home-made hang-glider flight aged 13. 

Since then Mark has surfed all over the world, climbed many Alps, free-dived on shipwrecks in the Caribbean, sailed across the Atlantic on a boat he built in a potato shed and learnt to fly paragliders (the most ridiculous aircraft there is) across the Welsh mountains (not the Preselis). 

Mark has been instructing all kinds of outdoor pursuits, from climbing to archery to surfing and coasteering, since 2007. Early on he realised that not only is coasteering pretty much the best of them all, but Pembrokeshire is probably the best place in the world to do it.

Tom - Head Guide, Vintner

Tom likes kayaks. A lot. He first sat in one aged 6 and despite the sanitary practicalities, didn’t get out ’til he was well into his teens. During that time he represented Wales in kayak polo and paddled/fell down many of the biggest waterfalls in Wales. He still sleeps in a ‘yak but now also operates on land and has climbed all over from the Caucasus Mountains (where an incident with an upside-down map led to an accidental crossing into Russia) to the slopes of Mont Blanc. Tom is the proprietor of the only vineyard in Sageston.

Tom now leads expeditions all over the world and is the holder of the almost mythical 5 Star kayak award as well as a wealth of qualifications in pretty much all of the outdoor pursuits. He’s been guiding coasteering since 2010 and loves it. Tom is a wild sea-food expert and you’re likely to find yourself munching on some unexpectedly tasty seaweed on one of his coasteers.

Emma - Guide, Queen of shells

Emma came to us a couple of years ago and asked for a job. We applied the usual tests  – asked her to jump off some chunky cliffs, swim through dark underwater caves, hold giant crabs. We took her coasteering in the sort of conditions we’d usually take one look at and go home. She took our tests with a weird calm and we knew she was one of us. Emma is now well on the way to lead guide.

Emma’s love of adventure developed when her parents took her travelling in a caravan for 6 months. Doesn’t sound that adventurous? Well this was Australia, where just a paddle in the sea often leads to a wrestle with a croc or a fight with a shark. As is compulsory for aussies – she then travelled extensively until she wound up here in Pembs. Emma surfs, kayaks and climbs. She also enjoys beer-pong.

 

Josh - Lead guide, Stone monkey

Josh loves climbing. A lot. And he’s a qualified instructor. 

When he’s not climbing he’s at home in his shed, climbing on the tiny climbing wall he built in there. Or doing pull-ups to train for climbing. Sometimes he strokes his dog or chats to his girlfriend Nia – but usually he’ll be doing pull ups at the same time. He even has a pull-up bar above his bed for sleep pull-ups. Josh spends the winter at his olive grove in Portugal, harvesting his olives and enjoying the amazing climbing there.

Josh has seen all the extremes of coasteering during his time guiding – his first coasteer with us was a brutal, early-season mission with the Royal Marines in rather chunky conditions and he’s since seen everything from glassy-calm cruises around Tenby to onshore chaos at Lydstep.